Monthly Archives: December 2015

Handling Holiday Questions with Ease!

Soon to be college students and those in college, here are a few thoughts on how to handle the questions of “What are you studying/going to study? What kind of job are going to get?” during your holiday gatherings.

If you are unsure of which college you will choose to go to, or the major you plan to select, I suggest turning the question back on the person asking it. “How did you decide to go to the college you went to? What college was it? Where was it? What was your major the first day you were there? What major did you graduate with?” etc. Like in current times, people who were in college 10-30 years ago, often changed their majors, struggled with an academic obstacle, and have a story or two to share. Get these people talking about their college experience! If the person asking the question did not go to college, ask her/him what they would have studied if they had gone, and why they are selecting that major/field of study now.

If you are nearing the end of your college career, of course people are asking you what career or job you are headed toward. In these cases, I again suggest asking this person questions rather than replying right away. “What did you do the day after you graduated? How long did it take you to find a career related position? How long did you stay in that job? When did you realize you were on the path to the position you have now? What advice do you have for me? What are the top two traits you are looking for when you hire an entry-level employee?” It is extremely unlikely the person you are speaking with is doing the same job s/he did when they graduated, and soliciting advice from her/him is wise. You can thank the person for all their insights and never answer the question they asked you!

When you answer questions about your major/field of study, I suggest you speak passionately! Demonstrate your enthusiasm for YOUR choice by talking smartly about your classes, the research you are doing, the faculty you are learning from, and the opportunities you have engaged in on your campus. Share fun-facts about your program and/or college, and be proud of what you are accomplishing.

When answering questions about your intended career, be positive in your responses, showing confidence in YOUR decision to get a Bachelor’s degree in this field. Talk about the career workshops you have attended, the guest lectures you have seen (that have inspired you), and the resume you have already drafted. Ask if s/he would like to see it, and a sample cover letter you have written, and ask for feedback and edits. Also, make sure to ask this person if they know anyone in this field, or a similar field with whom I could do an informational interview. Informational interviews are a great way to learn more about an actual position and a company – take advantage of these connections.

Now you are ready to embrace these loaded question gatherings!

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

Repeating a Course

College students: the end of the term is upon you! Maybe you are already enjoying winter break, the students at the university I work at vacated campus last weekend, or maybe your only motivation through finals right now is your excitement for the upcoming Star Wars premier. If you are in the midst of finals, stay focused, committed, and give your best to these exams, projects and papers.

As you are anticipating and checking your grades, some of you may find yourself in an unhappy place. There are students who are satisfied with the ‘C-‘ they earned in a difficult course, but another student may be in agony over a ‘B-‘ in a course they really enjoyed and thought they were doing well. Another student might be solely focused on her/his GPA as they are planning on professional school, and have a desire to repeat a class in which they received an ‘A-.’ Should you find yourself in a situation where you want to repeat a course, you need to look up your campus’ course repeat policy.

Many institutions, especially ones with a large number of students, have very clear guidelines on repeating courses. Often, if a student received a ‘C’ or ‘C-‘ the course cannot be retaken. Generally the reason for this is: seats in the course need to be available for students taking it for the first time, sometimes it is so students stay on track for a four year graduation plan. At other institutions, a student may be able to repeat a course s/he received a passing grade, but the second grade will not be calculate into the student’s GPA. (The course and grade are on the official transcript, but not in the overall GPA calculation.)

Whatever the reason for considering a course repeat, know the repeat policy. So, for those of you heading into a final – you now have some extra motivation to put the time and energy into your studies! Give 100%, you will not be disappointed with yourself!